~ Magnetic Stars ~

709,342 notes

me:
thinking inappropriate thoughts
me:
thinking inappropriate thoughts
me:
thinking inappropriate thoughts
me:
thinking inappropriate thoughts
me:
thinking inappropriate thoughts
me:
thinking inappropriate thoughts
me:
thinking inappropriate thoughts
me:
omg what if I actually said something out loud
me:
omg what if there is a telepath around here

137,445 notes

lacigreen:

squidsqueen:

What makes me so happy about this is that she isn’t telling you you must love your body or that you are obligated to. She saying you have permission to. And that’s important, because there are a lot of reasons why people have trouble with self-love.  But the idea that you aren’t supposed to love your body, that you aren’t allowed to for whatever reason, needs to be crushed. If you can’t love you body right now, if your body causes you pain or disphoria or distress, you aren’t required to love it. But you are ALLOWED to. You are entitled to the chance to make peace with your body, if you ever reach a point where you are ready to. No one else should be trying to stop you.

beautifully said ^

(Source: beyxnika)

12,659 notes

I don’t know why people teach kids about ‘pimples’ and ‘hormones’ and ‘armpit hair’, and refrain from telling them that if they don’t achieve their billion-dollar dreams at the age of twenty-one, there will still be much more to life. And that when you fail at your first job, it isn’t going to be the end of the world. And eventually you will realize that each person’s world is different and your only job is to figure out what your best world can be.

Hannah Hart, My Drunk Kitchen

the realest life advice you will ever get 

(via helbigandswift)

(via mydrunkkitchen)

2,790 notes

If you mix the mashed potatoes and sauce, you can’t separate them later. It’s forever. The smoke comes out of Daddy’s cigarette, but it never goes back in. We cannot go back. That’s why it’s hard to choose. You have to make the right choice. As long as you don’t choose, everything remains possible.
Mr. Nobody (via lydiamartnz)

(via lalalalagrid)

66,710 notes

inkstainedrainbows:

Can I just point out how accurately Tangled portrayed an abusive parent.

Real talk, as someone who deals with similar things from one of my parents, I could point out really specific behaviors and go “yes. that. accurate beyond accurate” and it was almost painful to watch at times. 

Aside from the obvious fact that Mother Gothel locked Rapunzel in a tower and exploited her for her hair’s power, there is also a running theme of emotional manipulation through the way she communicates with Rapunzel. 

First she lashes out verbally, and when Rapunzel has a natural stress reaction, flinching away or showing emotional pain, she guilts her for that reaction. “Oh great, now I’m the bad guy,” or some variation of the above statement. How many times have I heard that from a parent while having a panic attack as a response to aggressive verbal attack? Too many to count. Turning around and putting the guilt on the other person by making them feel like their reaction is not valid or out of proportion is a form of emotional manipulation.

Basically what they’re saying is “You’re making me feel bad for reacting negatively to my poor treatment of you” which makes literally no sense, but when phrased by guilt like “oh well I suppose you think I’m soooo evil” makes the other person feel responsible. 

Repeatedly throughout the movie Mother Gothel infantilizes Rapunzel, guilt trips her, and plays with her feelings to keep her trapped. It’s in the “little” things that she is able to maintain this abusive control. The seemingly small methods of manipulation through how the parent communicates with the child. This gif set clearly such unhealthy communication. 

Rapunzel was able to get out from the tower if she wanted to, with her hair. But she never did for her whole childhood, even when she knew she was turning 18, until Eugene showed up. Why? Because she was trapped by her mother emotionally. 

Even when Eugene shows up and gets her out of the tower, she’s still in this emotional roller coaster of “I’m free!” and “No, I’m a horrible child.” The blame and guilt becomes internalized. That sequence where she rapidly switches from excited to dejected and regretful seems comical at first but really accurately reflects how she was trapped in that mindset.

Things like the conversation in these gifs might seem minor. It might not seem to have much affect. But the little things pile up. The thing about emotional abuse is it isn’t always a huge dramatic obviously abusive incident. It can be manipulation and gaslighting over extended periods of time and that’s why it’s so hard to point out. If Rapunzel were to call her mother on her abuse in one of these conversations it would be easy for the mother to respond “What? A little thing like this? Stop overreacting.”

Which is why it’s so important to listen to victims of emotional abuse and not invalidate what they’re saying. Even if isolated incidents they point out don’t seem like much, a pattern of manipulation is still extremely harmful.

(Source: elsakingdom, via gnarly-quinn)